Glasshouse Country
© Bob Waldock
Glasshouse Mountains Discovery.
Captain Cook Discovers The Glass House Mountains. Glasshouse Mountains are a series of spectacular volcanic plugs rising dramatically from the coastal plain.  The first European to see the remarkable Glass House Mountains was Captain James Cook. In   his   Journal   on   17   May   1770   he   wrote:   "..however,   if   any   future   navigator   should   be   disposed   to   determine   the   question   whether   there   is   or is   not   a   river   in   this   place,   which   the   wind   would   not   permit   us   to   do,   the   situation   may   be   always   found   by   three   hills,   which   lie   to   the northward   of   it,   in   the   latitude   of   twenty   six   degrees   fifty   three   minutes. These   hills   lie   but   a   little   way   inland,   and   not   far   from   each   other:   they are   remarkable   for   the   singular   form   of   their   elevation,   which   very   much   resembles   a   glass   house,   and   for   this   reason   I   called   them   the Glass   Houses:   the   northern   most   of   the   three   is   the   highest   and   largest;   there   are   several   other   peaked   hills   inland   to   the   northward   of these, but these are not nearly so remarkable..." The   next   European   to   visit   the   area   was   Matthew   Flinders   who   spent   16   days   sailing   around   Moreton   Bay   in   July-August,   1799.   During   his explorations   he   came   ashore   and   climbed   Mount   Beerburrum   from   which   he   surveyed   the   whole   of   Moreton   Bay.   The   excellent   booklet Matthew Flinders in Moreton Bay 1799, published by the Redcliffe Historical Society, records Flinders visit to the Glasshouse Mountains: On   the   following   morning   Flinders   took   the   boat   up   a   small   creek   that   pointed   towards   the   peaks.   About   half   past   nine   he   left   the   boat accompanied   by   two   seamen   and   a   native.   The   country   they   passed   through   was   swampy,   covered   with   mangroves,   they   waded   through rocky   swamps.   In   observing   the   flat-topped   peak   (Tibrogargan)   it   was   considerably   nearer   than   the   highest   Glass-house   (Beerwah)   that   he had   first   meant   to   visit,   but   seeing   one   of   the   round   mount   (Beerburrum)   with   sloping   sides   was   nearer,   he   altered   course   for   it   and   after walking about nine miles from the boat he reached the top. "The   view   of   the   bay   and   neighbouring   country   was   very   extensive,   to   the   south   there   were   several   distinct   columns   of   smoke   visible.   The mount was a pile of loose stones of many sizes, which had made the ascent difficult.                                                                                 ____________________________________________________ Glass   House   Mountains   National   Park   is   a   heritage-listed   national   park   70   km   north   of   Brisbane.   It   consists   of   a   flat   plain   punctuated   by rhyolite   and   trachyte   Magma   Intrusions,   (not   as   previously   described   by   some,   as   the   cores   of   extinct   volcanoes)   that   formed   27   million   to 26   million   years   ago.   The   Magma   Intrusions   would   have   been   below   the   surface   the   mountains   would   once   have   had   pyroclastic   exteriors, but   these   have   eroded   away   over   the   last   28   million   years.   A   series   of   short   videos   has   been   produced   describes   the   geology   and   many other interesting aspects of the Glass House Mountains National Park https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRrLgCQs91xkVnqqtMQyioA The   park   was   established   in   1994.   On   23   June   2010   the   Queensland   Government   announced   the   expansion   of   the   park   to   include   an additional 2,117 hectares. Mount   Beerwah   is   the   highest   peak   within   the   park   at   555   m   (1,821   ft)   however   public   access   to   the   'tourist   track'   in   the   National   Park   has been   restricted   since   2009.[7]   Mount   Coonowrin   377   m   (1,237   ft)   is   the   second   highest   however   public   access   to   it   has   been   prohibited since   1999   and   Mount   Tibrogargan   at   364   m   (1,194   ft)   is   the   third   highest   which   is   open.   Walking   track   allow   access   to   the   summits   of Mount   Beerwah,   Mount   Tibrogargan   and   Mount   Ngungun,   however   climbing   of   Mount   Coonowrin   is   prohibited   due   to   the   danger   of   trachyte rock stability.  Source Wikipedia The Mountains by name and height. Mount Beerwah 555 m Mount Beerburrum,  276 m Mount Coochin,  235 m Mount Coonowrin or Crookneck, 377 m Mount Elimbah or The Saddleback,  129 m Mount Miketeebumulgrai,  199 m Mount Ngungun, 253 m Mount Tibberoowuccum,  220 m Mount Tibrogargan,  364 m Mount Tunbubudla or the Twins,  312 and 293 m Wild Horse Mountain,  123 m  
Glasshouse Country
Glasshouse Mountains Aboriginal Legend.
The Aboriginal Legend of Glass House Mountains
Captain Cook Discovers The Glass House Mountains. Glasshouse    Mountains    are    a    series    of    spectacular    volcanic plugs rising dramatically from the coastal plain.  The    first    European    to    see    the    remarkable    Glass    House Mountains was Captain James Cook. In   his   Journal   on   17   May   1770   he   wrote:   "..however,   if   any   future navigator   should   be   disposed   to   determine   the   question   whether there   is   or   is   not   a   river   in   this   place,   which   the   wind   would   not permit   us   to   do,   the   situation   may   be   always   found   by   three   hills, which   lie   to   the   northward   of   it,   in   the   latitude   of   twenty   six degrees   fifty   three   minutes.   These   hills   lie   but   a   little   way   inland, and   not   far   from   each   other:   they   are   remarkable   for   the   singular form    of    their    elevation,    which    very    much    resembles    a    glass house,   and   for   this   reason   I   called   them   the   Glass   Houses:   the northern   most   of   the   three   is   the   highest   and   largest;   there   are several   other   peaked   hills   inland   to   the   northward   of   these,   but these are not nearly so remarkable..." The   next   European   to   visit   the   area   was   Matthew   Flinders   who spent   16   days   sailing   around   Moreton   Bay   in   July-August,   1799. During   his   explorations   he   came   ashore   and   climbed   Mount Beerburrum   from   which   he   surveyed   the   whole   of   Moreton   Bay. The   excellent   booklet   Matthew   Flinders   in   Moreton   Bay   1799, published   by   the   Redcliffe   Historical   Society,   records   Flinders visit to the Glasshouse Mountains: On   the   following   morning   Flinders   took   the   boat   up   a   small creek   that   pointed   towards   the   peaks.   About   half   past   nine   he left   the   boat   accompanied   by   two   seamen   and   a   native.   The country    they    passed    through    was    swampy,    covered    with mangroves,   they   waded   through   rocky   swamps.   In   observing the   flat-topped   peak   (Tibrogargan)   it   was   considerably   nearer than   the   highest   Glass-house   (Beerwah)   that   he   had   first   meant to   visit,   but   seeing   one   of   the   round   mount   (Beerburrum)   with sloping    sides    was    nearer,    he    altered    course    for    it    and    after walking about nine miles from the boat he reached the top. "The    view    of    the    bay    and    neighbouring    country    was    very extensive,   to   the   south   there   were   several   distinct   columns   of smoke   visible.   The   mount   was   a   pile   of   loose   stones   of   many sizes,    which    had    made    the    ascent    difficult.( The    tracks    are maintained now, still difficult though ).                                                                             Glass    House    Mountains    National    Park    is    a    heritage-listed national   park   70   km   north   of   Brisbane.   It   consists   of   a   flat   plain punctuated   by   rhyolite   and   trachyte   volcanic   plugs,   the   cores   of extinct   volcanoes   that   formed   27   million   to   26   million   years   ago. The   mountains   would   once   have   had   pyroclastic   exteriors,   but these have eroded away.     The    park    was    established    in    1994.    On    23    June    2010    the Queensland   Government   announced   the   expansion   of   the   park to include an additional 2,117 hectares. Mount   Beerwah   is   the   highest   peak   within   the   park   at   555   m (1,821    ft)    however    public    access    to    the    'tourist    track'    in    the National     Park     has     been     restricted     since     2009.[7]     Mount Coonowrin    377    m    (1,237    ft)    is    the    second    highest    however public   access   to   it   has   been   prohibited   since   1999   and   Mount Tibrogargan   at   364   m   (1,194   ft)   is   the   third   highest   which   is open.    Walking    track    allow    access    to    the    summits    of    Mount Beerwah,    Mount    Tibrogargan    and    Mount    Ngungun,    however climbing   of   Mount   Coonowrin   is   prohibited   due   to   the   danger   of trachyte rock stability.  Source Wikipedia The Mountains by name and height. Mount Beerwah 555 m Mount Beerburrum,  276 m Mount Coochin,  235 m Mount Coonowrin or Crookneck, 377 m Mount Elimbah or The Saddleback,  129 m Mount Miketeebumulgrai,  199 m Mount Ngungun, 253 m Mount Tibberoowuccum,  220 m Mount Tibrogargan,  364 m Mount Tunbubudla or the Twins,  312 and 293 m Wild Horse Mountain,  123 m