Glasshouse Country
© Bob Waldock
About Beerburrum The   small   country      township   of   Beerburrum   is   located   on   the   Glass   House   Mountains   Tourist Drive, now known as the Steve Irwin Way. The   town   is   55   kilometres   north   of   Brisbane,   travelling   on   the   Bruce   Highway   towards   the Sunshine Coast.  Beerburrum   offers   visitors   the   chance   to   soak   up   more   than   80   years   of   local   history   thanks   to the   town's   World   War   I   Interpretive   Signage.   You   can   also   visit Anzac Avenue   and   the Avenue of    Trees    planted    in    1920.    The    town's    Interpretive    Signage    includes    old    photographs, recognising   Beerburrum's   involvement   with   the   soldier   settlement   scheme   for   Diggers   who served   In   World   War   I.   Around   500   blocks   of   land   were   allocated   to   returned   servicemen,   and 437   took   up   the   offer   and   laid   the   foundation   for   the   early   growth   of   the   towns   along   the   rail corridor   north   of   Brisbane.   In   the   longer   term,   many   of   the   soldier-settler   farms   unfortunately proved     be     unviable,     leading     to     abandonment     and     population     decline.     Subsequently, Beerburrum's   population   dwindled   from   647   in   1921   to   just   257   in   1954.         Beerburrum   had   a primary school, a public hall, a railway station, and a fruit grower's co-operative.
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Glasshouse Country
About Beerburrum The     small     country          township     of Beerburrum    is    located    on    the    Glass House    Mountains   Tourist    Drive,    now known as the Steve Irwin Way. The    town    is    55    kilometres    north    of Brisbane,     travelling     on     the     Bruce Highway towards the Sunshine Coast.  Beerburrum   offers   visitors   the   chance to   soak   up   more   than   80   years   of   local history   thanks   to   the   town's   World   War I    Interpretive    Signage.   You    can    also visit   Anzac   Avenue   and   the   Avenue   of Trees    planted    in    1920.    The    town's Interpretive      Signage      includes      old photographs,                        recognising Beerburrum's     involvement     with     the soldier   settlement   scheme   for   Diggers who   served   In   World   War   I.   Around   500   blocks   of   land   were   allocated   to returned   servicemen,   and   437   took   up   the   offer   and   laid   the   foundation   for the   early   growth   of   the   towns   along   the   rail   corridor   north   of   Brisbane.   In the   longer   term,   many   of   the   soldier-settler   farms   unfortunately   proved   be unviable,   leading   to   abandonment   and   population   decline.   Subsequently, Beerburrum's   population   dwindled   from   647   in   1921   to   just   257   in   1954.        Beerburrum   had   a   primary   school,   a   public   hall,   a   railway   station,   and   a fruit grower's co-operative.